Category Archives: Uncategorized

Voting, in the City and Elsewhere

I wonder why we are okay with this.

In the town where I live, we have skyrocketing housing prices, rapidly expanding homeless camps, gang violence, and a stadium that lost its NHL farm team. Despite this, the voter turnout for our municipal election was only 35%. So for 65% of the 141,000 people who live here, this is all a perfectly fine outcome. Most of the people voted in were incumbents. It could have been worse, many of the new anti-SOGI trustee candidates did not get in, but other conservative candidates held on to their positions. It just boggles my mind that most people in my hometown could not be moved to take 10 minutes and vote.

I wonder if this is what true privilege looks like. To be so far removed from the decisions governing your life that anything short of a military coup d’etat couldn’t get you out to the polls. Then again, are we so beaten down by the crime and poverty that we just accept it as a part of life?

I’m probably thinking too hard about this. The truth is, city politics is just not exciting enough for most people. The CBC ran episode of “Murdoch Mysteries” instead of the Toronto election results, and the stakes were far higher for that contest.

It just feels lonely more than anything. I like the idea that I have a say in the way government is run. All that boring stuff creates decisions that fundamentally change our lives and that’s exciting. I don’t feel like I can shame people for not voting if they don’t feel represented. God knows I don’t feel represented every time I head to the polls. But if this isn’t working, we need to have better options than just being ruled over by decree.

The Cishet Male Selfie

Why do men hate taking selfies? Messing around on the internet one night, I decided to type this question into google. All I came up with was a bunch of articles talking about how men hate it when women take selfies. It was like I was looking at the patriarchy in clickbait form. Not only were people not asking why men didn’t take selfies, but they were more concerned about men’s opinions of other people who took did selfies. Talk about making it all about you.

The cishet male selfie is rare beast out in the wild internet. They don’t post photos of themselves in an outfit saying, “I feel handsome today”. Guys night out remains undocumented. It’s like we’ve selectively airbrushed ourselves off the internet. Why?

Since we live in a patriarchy, we men tend to denigrate anything that women are into. See the backlash against the Twilight novels and the Netflix She-ra reboot. We also have traditional values against vanity and being focused on personal appearance, going all the way back to the Narcissus myth in Ancient Greece. Being too obsessed with anything is bad to be sure, but what’s wrong with simply regarding your own self-image? What is wrong with trying to control it, if only for a brief moment?

In 2014, the #365FeministSelfie campaign was launched by Veronica Arreolla. It challenged the media stereotypes surrounding selfies. It encouraged women to take control of their own self image, use these photographs as expressions of their authentic selves and their bodily autonomy. Now you’d think men, with all our exhortations about individualism and self-sufficiency would be all about that, but not so much!

I think what really puts men off of taking selfies is the vulnerability of it all. Not only are you putting up an image of yourself for all to see, critique, and photoshop into compromising positions, but you are admitting to an aspect of your humanity. You dared to regard yourself. We men are all about policing each other’s humanity. Ever since we are children, if you admit to loving people, having fears, even having things that make you angry, that one emotion patriarchy allows you to have, that information can be weaponized against you. You are a target for ridicule, isolation, and worse.

Why do we accept this? If we value our freedom, our autonomy, why do we put up with our own erasure? When you get right down to it, a lot of Patriarchy is made up of social scripts that we follow simply without thinking. When we break those scripts, the illusion breaks down and we have to consider our place in society. When we do that, we look back on the old script and realize what it cost us emotionally to maintain it. We feel the freedom. And if you want to feel that freedom too, post that outfit if you’re enjoying how you look today, capture that post-workout flush on your cheeks at the gym, or just find your good side.

James Buys A Vita


Sometimes I look at my video game collection, both real and virtual, and think that there is no possible way I’ll be able to play all of this in my lifetime. I spent well in my youth, and now the years of combing bargain bins at the local Electronics Boutique has left me a virtual playground to rival Inception, the Matrix, and the Holodeck combined.

It was around one of those times that one of my co-workers mentioned she had a spare Playstation Vita lying around. I chuckled to myself, thinking that even if I had it, it would be YEARS before I could play games on it. Still, the months wore on, and that Vita was still available for a very reasonable price. So I thought to myself, I work hard, I pay taxes, I pull back into the slow lane on my morning commute. I need a symbol of my diligence, tangible proof that I can hold in my hands and then say to myself, “I contribute to society”.
So I paid in cash, and now I have it! Even though it’s officially a legacy platform in Sony’s eyes, there are still a few games that I’m excited to play on it. Some of these are already out, and some of them will have to remain as japanese imports. I’m actually looking forward to putting down cash for some of these at a convention. So much more personal than online! Here are my top five:

5. Disgaea 3 & 4

I’m a strategy RPG fanatic, and the Disgaea series is one of the genre’s 800 pound gorillas. In any given entry to the series, you lead an army of adorable demons in a dastardly plot to take over the multiverse. The characters use attacks like 10 person suplexes with damage counts numbering in the millions of hit points. There are so many ways to grind and level up your army. Even the weapons all have rogue-like dungeons inside of them where you can improve your weapon and your warriors. I will probably finish these games and make it to Disgaea 5 some time around the heat death of the universe.

4. Attack on Titan

The Titans of Hajime Isayama’s manga are serious business. They are so tough, you would need an army of Ninjas- no an army of Spidermen-  no, Ninja-Spidermen! Luckily in you get to join this Ninja Spider-man army and defend Humanity from the ultimate in Fee-fi-fo-fum.

3. Berserk

When Koei Tecmo decided to make Dynasty Warriors, a game where you literally fight hundreds of enemies, it’s hard to believe they didn’t have Berserk in mind. There’s nothing like taking a huge sword to mow down entire armies to take your mind off a day in traffic.

2. Macross Delta Scramble

 

The Macross Scramble series absolutely ruled on the original PSP. Since Macross Delta is still on the air, I hope the campaign mode is a little more involved. It’s hard to get invested in the story if you are constantly reminded that it’s just a simulation.

1. Super Frickin’ Robot Wars

This game series is the my chocolate and peanut butter. You have every giant robot series banding together in a loosely plotted cross-over scenario to carry out the most ridiculous attacks in a scenario that is…well…a battle royale would not even begin to describe it. In this latest installment, Super Robot Wars Victory, Space Battleship Yamato is getting a special guest appearance, fighting alongside the Mobile Suits of Gundam, Macross’ Valkyries, and so, so, many others. It is pure madness, and it’s also getting an English translation! I’m freaking out here!

Are We Spamming You?

What is the etiquette on personal marketing? How many times to you have to post on Facebook or Twitter before people know you are doing a thing they might want to check out? At what point does it become annoying? These questions have been bothering me lately, not because I’ve got something to promote (yet), but it seems as though I’m the last to know when my friends are doing something creative, like a webcomic, a music album, or home business.

Of course, I could just ask people what they’re doing through private messaging, but that just sounds rude. You might catch them at the exact moment of their life when circumstance stands to rip away all of their artistic dreams and toss them into the ether. Or you might remind them that they haven’t worked on their thing in ages, and that their big chance might have slipped away.

Now, if you’ve already made a thing, how do you get the kind of feedback you need to get better? Your only option there is to solicit comments and criticism privately, but then, there is always that shadow of a doubt that you might be terrible and everyone is just too polite to say anything.

As someone with delusions of creativity, I want to see my internet feeds full of people trying new things. I want to see that first painting as much as I want to see that advanced cosplay prop photographed with a new lighting rig. Art is such a personal kind of communication. It increases our collective self-knowledge in a way that’s different from the kind of social media overshare that we’re all afraid of. There are some squicky aspects to it, but I’m just be generous with my likes and comments until we figure them out.

Contributing to Open source in 8 easy steps

 

If you want to find a job as a programmer, a four year degree may not be enough.Formal education can only tell employers so much about what you know and how you work. Fortunately, most of the internet is now run by open source software, which anybody, and I do mean anybody, can contribute to. In 2015, over 98% of servers are run using some form of Linux, an operating system that was written by community of thousands over the past 23 years. http://www.w3cook.com/os/summary/ Almost every kind of software out there has an open source counterpart that you can download, compile, or make changes to yourself. It’s a great way to teach yourself programming and get the attention of prospective employers. You may think, well that’s fine and good for a genius like you, James, but how do *I* get into open source software? Easy, just follow these 8 steps.

1. Get a Github account
Github.com is kind of like Facebook for programmers. It allows you to post your code and track all of your changes using a handy version control program called git. Just head to github.com and pick a username and password!
2. Find a project
This step is going to be different for each person, but you generally want to pick something that people are using and are contributing to. That way you can get more feedback from people in charge of the project or from the users. You can find new projects by browsing github, sourceforge, or by looking up any old open source product you like to use, like firefox or WordPress. When it comes to web software, my favourite place to find new projects is Refactorcop. It was a winner at the 2014 rails rumble, and it analyzes github projects on Ruby on Rails, and makes sure they comply with the code standards in the Ruby style guide. You can use Refactorcop’s search engine to find projects that need code cleanup, a process that doesn’t change the program’s functionality, but ensures that the code is easier to read and contribute to.

3. Check the issues page
Once you choose an open source project, you should check the issues page on the repository to find out where you can contribute. These may be features, bug fixes, or general annoyances that users have noticed. These issue pages are also a good way to tell if your project is active. Active projects mean that you will be able to get quick feedback on any code you contribute.

4. Fork the project
“Forking” refers to a process where you create your own “branch” of a software project within its version control system, which is kind of like a family tree for computer programs. If you are still confused, I think Github’s help page can do a better job of explaining it then I can.

5. Download and Test the project
This may be the most important step of the whole process. It proves that this program you want to work on isn’t broken. It can also give you some inspiration for changes you want to add yourself. Use the git clone command to download the code.

6. Program
This is where that four year degree (and a lot of google) comes in. Add your code, make sure it’s readable, test it out, and commit it to your branch!

7. Submit a pull request
Once you are confident that your code has made the software better, send a pull request to the original project. Here is Github’s tutorial on pull requests.

All that’s left is to wait for the project manager to approve your changes, and voila! You are now contributing to the open source community! Sit back, crack a beer, and know that you have made the future just a little bit better! Thanks goes out to Dan Kubb and everyone else in the Fraser valley Ruby Brigade who introduced me to this whole process.